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South Bay Vascular Center and Vein Institute, with offices in Campbell and Gilroy CA., is recognized as one of the leading vascular surgery practices in Northern California. In addition to their cutting edge work in amputation prevention, South Bay Vascular Center is widely recognized as the leading center for the diagnosis and treatment of iliac-vein compression, medically know as May-Thurners disease, in the whole of the Western United States. Using the most advanced diagnostic imagining technology, Intra Vascular Ultrasound (IVUS), Dr's Kokinos and Pineda have treated more patients for this mostly undiagnosed cause of leg swelling....a condition which often presents in patients as left leg swelling, than any other medical practice in ...

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Dr Kokinos speaks on complex dialysis access issues at the annual CIDA conference (Controversies in Dialysis Access) in San Diego, California. CiDA's accredited scientific program provides the highest quality of comprehensive, interactive education for all clinicians involved in the care and treatment of dialysis patients. Recognized as a thought leader in Dialysis Access, Dr. Kokinos is proud to be on the forefront of advances in dialysis access. Together with her partner Dr. Carlos Pineda, South Bay Vascular Center and Vein Institute physicians brings their patients the highest level of clinical training and surgical expertise.

South Bay Vascular Center and Vein Institute is recognized the premiere dialysis access center in the Silicon ...

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Over the last few decades the treatment of chronic wounds (wounds that haven’t healed in 4 weeks) has become increasingly complicated and expensive. Thousands of specialized “Wound Care Centers” have cropped up across the country. The idea behind these is founded on the fact that getting these types of wounds to heal often requires physicians and nurses of different backgrounds and with special training. These centers are often made up of physicians such as podiatrists, general surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, vascular surgeons, plastic surgeons, infectious disease doctors, diabetic specialists, etc. The reason for that is that it is often the underlying medical issues such as diabetes, poor nutrition, the presence of inf...

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Millions of Americans suffer from wounds that don’t heal. It’s a problem most don’t even think about until they or a loved one develops this type of wound. After all, every one of us has fallen or hurt ourselves with a resulting wound. It generally hurts for a little, we put a little Neosporin or a band-aid on it, and forget about it. Pretty soon, it is gone, and there is a little or big scar in its place. However, as we get older, and develop medical issues, this healing may not happen. A wound that has been “open” for more than four weeks, is called a chronic wound, and often needs the special attention of a wound care center. In these centers, team of specially trained nurses and doctors use a variety of ...

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One of the most common contributors to the development of leg wounds is venous disease. This can occur either because of venous insufficiency—leaky valves in the leg veins or because of issues stemming from a DVT (deep venous thrombosis). Both of these problems contribute by causing high pressure at the ankles that impair the healing of the wounds. Silicon Valley's South Bay Vascular Center and Vein Institute doctors are recognized as the leading wound care physicians in the greater San Francisco Bay Area and Dr. Kokinos is the medical director at both the Verity/O'Connor Wound Care Center in San Jose and St Louise Hospital Wound Care Center in Morgan Hill, CA.

Venous wounds have a classic appearance. The wound is generally around t...

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Polyxene Kokinos MD, a Board Certified Vascular and General Surgeon of South Bay Vascular Center and Vein Institute was recently appointed as the new medical director of the O'Connor and St. Louise Hospital's wound care clinics. Dr Kokinos brings over 25 years of vascular surgery experience to her new position as medical director and is recognized as a national expert in the treatment of peripheral vascular and arterial disease. Dr. Kokinos has a special interest in the treatment of lower extremity and deep venous disease and is recognized as one of the country's leading experts in this area. Working in partnership with the award winning Wound Care Center at O'Connor hospital, Dr Kokinos was selected as the new medical director because o...

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KPIX- TV CBS Channel 5 will feature South Bay Vascular Center and Vein Institute as a Vascular Surgery Center of Excellence on Saturday October 21, 2017 at 7:00 PM.

Recognized as the premiere Vascular Surgery practice in the greater San Francisco Bay Area, Dr. Polyxene Kokinos and Dr. Carlos Pineda will discuss their cutting edge approach for preventing lower limb amputations. Additionally, the program will focus on advanced surgical techniques to re-establish blood flow to aid in diabetic wound healing and the resolution of asymmetrical leg swelling.

Produced by Medical Media Group, South Bay Vascular Center is honored to be featured in this special presentation.

Please join us by watching KPIX -TV Channel 5 on October 21st at 7:00 PM.

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Over the past 15 years the interventional treatment for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has changed significantly with endovascular revascularization replacing surgically invasive procedures as the dominant intervention. Early detection and treatment are important to control the disease and to allow patients a full selection of treatment options.

Diagnosis

Many types of health care providers can diagnose and treat PAD. Family physicians, internists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and vascular specialists can all diagnose PAD by examining a patient’s medical and family history, performing a physical exam, and conducting diagnostic tests. PAD can be diagnosed through a variety of diagnostic procedures including:

  • Ankle-brachial index (ABI):A common test used to measures the difference between blood pressure at the arm and at the ankle. A difference in the two areas indicates restricted blood flow.
  • Ultrasound
  • CT and MR angiograms
  • Angiography
  • Blood tests

Treatment

Th...

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According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 18 million people in the United States suffer from Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), a common circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to the limbs. Estimates suggest that anywhere from 12 to 20 percent of individuals over the age of 60 are living with PAD. Approximately 160,000 to 180,000 of the estimated 18 million Americans with PAD will undergo a limb amputation as result of PAD-related condition this year, resulting in lower quality of life, high medical costs, and shorter life expectancy.

But even with these alarming numbers, general population awareness of PAD is estimated at only 25 percent. Symptoms of severe PAD include l...

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SOUTH BAY VASCULAR CENTER AND VEIN INSTITUTE LAUNCHES FALL 2017 PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE (PAD) OUTREACH AND EDUCATIONAL CAMPAIGN
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